Butterfly Gardening in Wisconsin

Editor Note: Now, while we are adding to or otherwise improving our garden, here are some ideas on how to improve it for the fauna.

From the Southern Wisconsin Butterfly Association (edited)

Butterfly gardening adds beauty to your yard and provides habitat for butterflies. Much critical butterfly habitat has been lost, so any butterfly-friendly terrain we provide as gardeners can help many species survive. Once butterflies appear in your yard, it’s great fun to learn to identify them, take photographs, and observe behavior.

Butterfly gardening is easy to do; you need to follow a few simple guidelines: Continue reading

Invertebrate Conservation Fact Sheet – Upper Midwest Plants For Native Bees (edited)

From The Xerces Society

In such a short fact sheet it is not possible to give detailed lists of suitable plants for all areas of the Upper Midwest. Below are two lists of good bee plants, the first of native plants and the second of garden plants. Both are short lists; there are many more bee-friendly plants. However, these lists, combined with the following notes, will get you started on selecting good bee plants. Your local chapters of the Wild Ones, the Native Plant Society and native plant nurseries are worthwhile contacts for advice on choosing, obtaining, and caring for local plant species.

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Invertebrate Conservation Fact Sheet – Nests For Native Bees (edited)

From The Xerces Society

There are 4,000 species of native bees in North America. Together they form the most important group of pollinators. Like all wildlife they are affected by changes in our landscapes, especially the loss of nesting sites. Bees make nests in which they create and provision brood cells for their offspring. In many modern landscapes, a desire for neatness has usually resulted in the removal of bare ground, dead trees, and untidy corners of rough grass—all important nesting sites for bees. This fact sheet gives information on how to provide nest sites for native bees, including nest blocks and bare ground for solitary-nesting bees, and nesting boxes for bumble bees. For more information, visit our web site,www.xerces.org, where you will find other fact sheets and more detailed guidelines on how to enhance habitat for pollinators. You’ll also find information about the Pollinator Conservation Handbook.

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