Yellow, growing low, what is it?

by Betty Struckhoff

Strolling in the woods on Saturday, I spotted an delightful yellow bloom with waxy leaves in a low area not far from a creek.  It may or may not be a native plant.  Here is a photo:

Unidentified plant with yellow spring blooms

Can anyone tell me what it is?

11 thoughts on “Yellow, growing low, what is it?

  1. Betty’s plant is Squaw-weed (Senecio obovatus) which makes a good ground cover in shady areas.
    Bill

  2. I think the jury is still out. Petals are narrower and more elongated than Marsh Marigold. Senecios all have multi- flowered stems and these are single flowers. Maybe I’ll cut a sample and bring to next week’s meeting for some mre expert opinion.

  3. I found a single plant of it in my yard also. I’ve never seen it before. It is located near a plant I transplanted from Nathan’s yard prior to his selling his property last year. Possibly it was in that soil.

  4. I’,m pretty sure I have seen this plant growing in a wild swampy area in Spring Park in St. Peters where many other wildflowers flourish, or did before it became a well traveled public park. I, too, believe it’s some sort of buttercup. Squaw weed is taller and grows along roadsides, but I’ve never seen this plant along roads. I love it, also.

  5. On the other hand, I’m ever more sure Bill knows more than I do. I’m still sorting things out.

  6. Looks to me like Ranunculus ficaria (lesser celandine), which is not only exotic, but also invasive in some areas. I don’t think it’s Packera / Senecio (squaw weed), which has superficially similar flowers but an entirely different growth habit.

  7. Alas, as noted at last Wednesday’s meeting, the verdict is Ranunculus ficaria, commonly known as Fig Buttercup. It is an exotic and is considered a noxious weed in some states.

    More information here: http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=RAFI. You can compare the photos to that for Marsh Marigold in the link in Jeanne’s post: http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=capa5. Fig Buttercup is also distinguished by little tubers or bulblets on the roots.

    I zapped it in our common ground this morning with Round-up. Maybe later I’ll put some Bluebell seedlings from my yard there. They should be very happy in that spot.

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